CVE-85 U.S.S. Shipley Bay - History

CVE-85 U.S.S. Shipley Bay - History


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Shipley Bay

(CVE-85: dp. 7,800; 1. 512'3"; b. 65'2''; ew. 108'1''; dr. 20'; s. 19.3 k.; cpl 860; a. 1 5'', 16 40mm.; cl. Casablanca)

Shipley Bay (CVE-85) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1122) on 22 November 1943 by Kaiser Co., Inc., Vancouver, Wash, launched on 12 February 1944, sponsored by Mrs. L. B. Richardson
and commissioned on 21 March 1944, Capt. Edgar T. Neale in command.

Shipley Bay moved down the coast and operated in the San Diego-San Pedro area until 3 May when the carrier began her maiden voyage to Pearl Harbor and the South Pacific ferrying planes and pilots to advance bases. She shuttled between the west coast, Pearl Harbor, Majuro Atoll, Guadalcanal, and Tulagi until October. During this period, the carrier transported 496 aircraft.

Shipley Bay's next assignment was that of replenishment carrier, delivering pilots, aircraft, and ammunition to the fast carriers operating with Task Force (TF) 38. She rendezvoused with TF 38 for three resupply missions, delivering 100 planes. The first rendezvous was made from 17 to 29 October, 150 miles east of Samar, P.I.; the second took place 450 miles east of Luzon from 10 to 24 December; and the last, from 26 December 1944 to 12 January 1945, occurred 350 miles northeast of Luzon. Shipley Bay returned to Pearl Harbor and operated as a training carrier for the next three months.

On 22 April, Shipley Bay stood out of Pearl Harbor en route to Okinawa, via Guam for her first combat operations. From 7 to 16 May, planes from the carrier attacked enemy gun emplacements, supply dumps, radar installations, and caves, flying 352 missions. On the 16th, while taking on gasoline from Cache (AO-67), the aviation gasoline tanks were damaged, and she was forced to return to Guam for repairs.

Shipley Bay was back in action off Okinawa on 9 June with five other escort carriers. From 14 to 16 June, strikes were launched against Miyako Shima and Ishigaki Shima to neutralize the airfields on those islands. Aircraft from Shipley Bay returned to pound the airfields again from 18 to 22 June. On that day, the carrier departed the operating area. She was at the repair base in San Diego undergoing overhaul when the war ended.

On 26 September 1945, Shipley Bay sailed out of San Diego to participate in Operation "Magic Carpet," the return of American forces from overseas. The carrier shuttled from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor, Okinawa and Kwajalein, returning several thousand troops to the United States.

Shipley Bay sailed to Boston in February 1946 for deactivation and lay-up, arriving there on 9 March. On 28 June, the carrier was placed "out of commission, in reserve," with the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Shipley Bay was struck from the Navy list on 1 March 1959 and sold for scrap on 2 October of that year.

Shipley Bay receivd two battle stars for World War II service.


USS Shipley Bay

USS Shipley Bay (CVE-85) was a Casablanca-class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was named after Shipley Bay, located within Kosciusko Island. The bay in turn was named after Ensign John H. Shipley, an officer on the ship surveying the Alexander Archipelago. Launched in February 1944, and commissioned in March 1944, she served in support of the Battle of Okinawa. Postwar, she participated in Operation Magic Carpet. She was decommissioned in June 1946, when she was mothballed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Ultimately, she was sold for scrapping in October 1959.

  • 8,188 long tons (8,319 t) (standard)
  • 10,902 long tons (11,077 t) (full load)
  • 512 ft 3 in (156.13 m) (oa)
  • 490 ft (150 m) (wl)
  • 65 ft 2 in (19.86 m)
  • 108 ft (33 m) (extreme width)
  • 4 × Babcock & Wilcox boilers
  • 9,000 shp (6,700 kW)
  • 2 × Skinner Unaflowreciprocating steam engines
  • 2 × screws
  • Total: 910 – 916 officers and men
    • Embarked Squadron: 50 – 56
    • Ship's Crew: 860
    • As designed:
    • 1 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 caldual-purpose gun
    • 8 × 40 mm (1.57 in) Bofors anti-aircraft guns
    • 12 × 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannons
    • Varied, ultimate armament:
    • 1 × 5"/38 cal gun
    • 8 × twin 40 mm Bofors anti-aircraft guns
    • 30 × Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannons
    • 1 × catapult
    • 2 × elevators
      (1944–1946) (1946–1958)

  • CVE-85 U.S.S. Shipley Bay - History

    In addition to fleet type Aircraft Carriers (CV, CVB and CVL), the World War II emergency generated a separate hull number series for aircraft carriers intended for auxiliary purposes such as escorting convoys, transporting aircraft and other missions that did not require high speed. Originally called Aircraft Escort Vessels (AVG), on 20 August 1942 the existing and planned ships of this type were reclassified as Auxiliary Aircraft Carriers (ACV). This was again changed on 15 July 1943 to the type's definitive classification: Escort Aircraft Carriers (CVE). World War II era U.S. CVE designs were derived from those of commercial freighters and tankers, either as conversions or as "built for the purpose" new construction. As such, they were similar in size and performance to the Navy's pioneer "flattop", USS Langley , which had started life as a big collier.

    Thirty-three ships numbered in the AVG/ACV/CVE series were transferred to Great Britain under Lend-Lease, some after brief U.S. Navy commissioned service. These are identified below, with the hull number prefix current at the time of their completion. In addition, six U.S. built escort carriers were specifically constructed for the British Royal Navy, though one ultimately went to the U.S. Navy instead. These were numbered separately, as BAVG-1 through BAVG-6, duplicating numbers assigned in the U.S. Navy's own AVG/ACV/CVE series, and are listed separately at the end of this page.

    By the mid-1950s, with the Navy's modern conventional airplanes now too "hot" for safe operation from CVEs, many of these ships were reclassifed as Escort Helicopter Aircraft Carriers (CVHE), while others became Utility Aircraft Carriers (CVU). The ships so designated retained their original AVG/ACV/CVE series hull numbers. Later in the decade, some of the survivors were reclassified as Aircraft Ferries (AKV), under a new numbering system. Two others were converted, or planned for conversion, to amphibious assault ships, with "main batteries" of U.S. Marines and their helicopter transports. One was initially redesignated CVHA, with a newly-assigned hull number. Later, both were taken into the LPH hull number series, along with three much larger Ticonderoga (or "long-hull Essex ") class aircraft carriers and seven new-design ships completed during the 1960s.

    In the early 1970s, under Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt's program to introduce lower capability warships as a supplement to the Navy's more sophisticated (and more expensive) combat vessels, a "Sea Control Ship" (or SCS) was planned and designed. This would have been similiar in both concept and size to the Escort Aircraft Carriers of a generation earlier. While none were built for the U.S. Navy, Spain modified the SCS design and constructed one example for operation of helicopters and short/vertical take off and landing aircraft. Several other nations built ships of similar size and capability, demonstrating the continuing attractiveness of the original Escort Aircraft Carrier concept where relatively modest capabilities are acceptable, or are all that can be afforded.

    This page provides the hull numbers of all U.S. Navy escort aircraft carriers numbered in the CVE series, with links to those with photos available in the Online Library.
    Note (1): Ships with significant U.S. Navy service are all listed as "CVE", with a note concerning different designators under which they saw prior commissioned service. Some of these may have borne other designators ("AVG" and/or "ACV") while under construction.
    Note (2): Ships that went to Great Britain are listed under the designator they carried when transferred. Some of these ships had short U.S. Navy commissioned service prior to transfer. Those commissioned for only a few days (or even less) are cited as having "very brief USN service". Those commissioned for a longer period (up to about two months) are cited with "brief USN service".

    See the list below to locate photographs of individual escort aircraft carriers.

    If the escort aircraft carrier you want does not have an active link on this page, contact the Photographic Section concerning other research options.

    Left Column --
    Escort Aircraft Carriers numbered
    CVE-1 through CVE-59:


    CVE-85 U.S.S. Shipley Bay - History

    (CVE-85: dp. 7,800 1. 512'3" b. 65'2'' ew. 108'1'' dr. 20' s. 19.3 k. cpl 860 a. 1 5'', 16 40mm. cl. Casablanca)

    Shipley Bay (CVE-85) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1122) on 22 November 1943 by Kaiser Co., Inc., Vancouver, Wash, launched on 12 February 1944, sponsored by Mrs. L. B. Richardson
    and commissioned on 21 March 1944, Capt. Edgar T. Neale in command.

    Shipley Bay moved down the coast and operated in the San Diego-San Pedro area until 3 May when the carrier began her maiden voyage to Pearl Harbor and the South Pacific ferrying planes and pilots to advance bases. She shuttled between the west coast, Pearl Harbor, Majuro Atoll, Guadalcanal, and Tulagi until October. During this period, the carrier transported 496 aircraft.

    Shipley Bay's next assignment was that of replenishment carrier, delivering pilots, aircraft, and ammunition to the fast carriers operating with Task Force (TF) 38. She rendezvoused with TF 38 for three resupply missions, delivering 100 planes. The first rendezvous was made from 17 to 29 October, 150 miles east of Samar, P.I. the second took place 450 miles east of Luzon from 10 to 24 December and the last, from 26 December 1944 to 12 January 1945, occurred 350 miles northeast of Luzon. Shipley Bay returned to Pearl Harbor and operated as a training carrier for the next three months.

    On 22 April, Shipley Bay stood out of Pearl Harbor en route to Okinawa, via Guam for her first combat operations. From 7 to 16 May, planes from the carrier attacked enemy gun emplacements, supply dumps, radar installations, and caves, flying 352 missions. On the 16th, while taking on gasoline from Cache (AO-67), the aviation gasoline tanks were damaged, and she was forced to return to Guam for repairs.

    Shipley Bay was back in action off Okinawa on 9 June with five other escort carriers. From 14 to 16 June, strikes were launched against Miyako Shima and Ishigaki Shima to neutralize the airfields on those islands. Aircraft from Shipley Bay returned to pound the airfields again from 18 to 22 June. On that day, the carrier departed the operating area. She was at the repair base in San Diego undergoing overhaul when the war ended.

    On 26 September 1945, Shipley Bay sailed out of San Diego to participate in Operation "Magic Carpet," the return of American forces from overseas. The carrier shuttled from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor, Okinawa and Kwajalein, returning several thousand troops to the United States.

    Shipley Bay sailed to Boston in February 1946 for deactivation and lay-up, arriving there on 9 March. On 28 June, the carrier was placed "out of commission, in reserve," with the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Shipley Bay was struck from the Navy list on 1 March 1959 and sold for scrap on 2 October of that year.


    USS Liscome Bay (CVE-56)

    Casablanca (CVE-55) Liscome Bay (CVE-56) Anzio (CVE-57) Corregidor (CVE-58) Mission Bay (CVE-59) Guadalcanal (CVE-60) Manila Bay (CVE-61) Natoma Bay (CVE-62) St. Lo (CVE-63) Tripoli (CVE-64) Wake Island (CVE-65) White Plains (CVE-66) Solomons (CVE-67) Kalinin Bay (CVE-68) Kasaan Bay (CVE-69) Fanshaw Bay (CVE-70) Kitkun Bay (CVE-71) Tulagi (CVE-72) Gambier Bay (CVE-73) Nehenta Bay (CVE-74) Hoggatt Bay (CVE-75) Kadashan Bay (CVE-76) Marcus Island (CVE-77) Savo Island (CVE-78) Ommaney Bay (CVE-79) Petrof Bay (CVE-80) Rudyerd Bay (CVE-81) Saginaw Bay (CVE-82) Sargent Bay (CVE-83) Shamrock Bay (CVE-84) Shipley Bay (CVE-85) Sitkoh Bay (CVE-86) Steamer Bay (CVE-87) Cape Esperance (CVE-88) Takanis Bay (CVE-89) Thetis Bay (CVE-90) Makassar Strait (CVE-91) Windham Bay (CVE-92) Makin Island (CVE-93) Lunga Point (CVE-94) Bismarck Sea (CVE-95) Salamaua (CVE-96) Hollandia (CVE-97) Kwajalein (CVE-98) Admiralty Islands (CVE-99) Bougainville (CVE-100) Matanikau (CVE-101) Attu (CVE-102) Roi (CVE-103) Munda (CVE-104)

    kts = knots | mph = miles-per-hour | nm = nautical miles | mi = miles | km = kilometers


    USS Shipley Bay (CVE-85)

    Авіаносець «Шиплі Бей» закладений 22 листопада 1943 року на верфі Kaiser Shipyards у Ванкувері. Спущений на воду 12 лютого 1944 року. Вступив у стрій 21 березня 1944 року.

    Після вступу в стрій авіаносець з жовтня 1944 року по травень 1945 року здійснював перевезення літаків для потреб тактичного з'єднання TF58/38.

    В період з 7 по 16 травня, під час битві за Окінаву, літаки «Шиплі Бей» завдавали ударів по японських позиціях. 16 травня 1945 року корабель був пошкоджений внаслідок зіткнення під час заправки паливом та вирушив на Гуам для ремонту.

    Після закінчення бойових дій корабель перевозив американських солдатів та моряків на батьківщину (операція «Magic Carpet»).

    28 квітня 1946 року авіаносець був виведений в резерв. 1 березня 1959 року він був виключений зі списків флоту та зданий на злам.


    Shipley Bay được đặt lườn vào ngày 22 tháng 11 năm 1943 tại Xưởng tàu Vancouver của hãng Kaiser Company, Inc. ở Vancouver, Washington. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 12 tháng 2 năm 1944 được đỡ đầu bởi bà L. B. Richardson và được Hải quân sở hữu và nhập biên chế vào ngày 21 tháng 3 năm 1944 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Đại tá Hải quân Edgar T. Neale.

    Shipley Bay tiến hành chạy thử máy dọc bờ biển khu vực San Diego-San Pedro, California cho đến ngày 3 tháng 5 năm 1944, khi nó thực hiện chuyến đi đầu tiên đến Trân Châu Cảng và khu vực Nam Thái Bình Dương vận chuyển máy bay thay thế và phi công đến các căn cứ nơi tuyến đầu. Nó đi lại giữa vùng bờ Tây, Trân Châu Cảng, Majuro, Guadalcanal và Tulagi cho đến tháng 10, vận chuyển tống cộng 496 máy bay trong giai đoạn này.

    Shipley Bay sau đó được phân công tiếp liệu tàu sân bay hạm đội, chuyển giao phi công, máy bay và đạn dược cho các tàu sân bay nhanh thuộc Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38. Nó đã ba lượt gặp gỡ Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38 để tiếp liệu, cung cấp hơn 100 máy bay lượt thứ nhất từ ngày đến ngày 17 đến ngày 29 tháng 10 tại vị trí 150 dặm (240 km) về phía Đông Samar, Philippines. Lượt thứ hai diễn ra cách 450 dặm (720 km) về phía Đông Luzon từ ngày 10 đến ngày 24 tháng 12 và lượt cuối cùng từ ngày 26 tháng 12 năm 1944 đến ngày 12 tháng 1 năm 1945 cách 350 dặm (560 km) về phía Đông Bắc Luzon. Nó sau đó quay về Trân Châu Cảng và hoạt động như một tàu sân bay huấn luyện trong ba tháng tiếp theo.

    Vào ngày 22 tháng 4, Shipley Bay rời Trân Châu Cảng để đi Okinawa ngang qua Guam cho hoạt động tác chiến đầu tiên của nó. Từ ngày 7 đến ngày 16 tháng 5, máy bay từ chiếc tàu sân bay đã tấn công các cứ điểm, kho tiếp liệu, trạm radar và hầm trú ẩn đối phương, thực hiện tổng cộng 352 phi vụ. Vào ngày 16 tháng 5, đang khi được tiếp nhiên liệu từ tàu chở dầu Cache (AO-67), các thùng chứa xăng máy bay của nó bị hư hại, và con tàu bị buộc phải quay trở về Guam để sửa chữa. Nó quay trở lại tác chiến ngoài khơi Okinawa vào ngày 9 tháng 6 cùng năm tàu sân bay hộ tống khác, và từ ngày 14 đến ngày 16 tháng 6, các cuộc không kích được nhắm vào Miyako-jima và Ishigaki-jima nhằm vô hiệu hóa sân bay trên các đảo này. Máy bay của nó lại tấn công các sân bay này từ ngày 18 đến ngày 22 tháng 6, trước khi nó rời khu vực chiến sự quay trở về Hoa Kỳ để đại tu.

    Shipley Bay vẫn đang được sửa chữa tại San Diego khi Nhật Bản đầu hàng kết thúc cuộc xung đột. Nó khởi hành từ đây vào ngày 26 tháng 9 để tham gia Chiến dịch "Magic Carpet", hoạt động hồi hương lực lượng quân đội từ nước ngoài. Con tàu đã đi lại giữa San Francisco và Trân Châu Cảng, Okinawa và Kwajalein, hồi hương hàng ngàn binh lính và cựu quân nhân trở về Hoa Kỳ.

    Shipley Bay lên đường đi Boston, Massachusetts vào tháng 2 năm 1946, đến nơi vào ngày 9 tháng 3, và được chuẩn bị để ngừng hoạt động. Nó được cho xuất biên chế và đưa về Hạm đội Dự bị Đại Tây Dương vào ngày 28 tháng 6 năm 1946. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 1 tháng 3 năm 1959 và con tàu bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 2 tháng 10 năm 1959.

    Shipley Bay được tặng thưởng hai Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


    CVE-85 U.S.S. Shipley Bay - History

    USS Prichett (DD-561)
    Ship's History

    Source: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (Published 1981)

    Prichett (DD�) was laid down 20 July 1942 by the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Co., Seattle, Wash. launched 31 July 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Orville A. Tucker and commissioned 15 January 1944, Comdr. Cecil T. Caulfield in command.

    Following shakedown Prichett sailed, 1 April 1944, for Majuro, thence to Manus where she joined the battleships of Task Force (TF) 58. On the 28th, the seven battleships and 14 destroyers of Task Group (TG) 58.3 sortied and, rendezvousing with the fast carriers of TG 58.1, steamed northeast. On the 29th and 30th, while carrier aircraft bombed and strafed Japanese held airfields in the Carolines, Prichett served in the screen, where she rescued two Lexington (CV-16) aviators who ditched their damaged Grumman TBF Avenger. The next day, the surface warships bombarded wharfs, seaplane bases and other installations on Ponape before the entire force retired to Majuro, whence Prichett returned to Pearl Harbor.

    There fighter director equipment was installed and on 30 May she sailed west again, with TF 52 for the invasion of Saipan. Having screened the transports to the objective, Prichett shifted her protective duties to the battleships as they bombarded the shore, then provided gunfire support to the troops landed on 15 June. A highlight of this operation was the rare rescue of a Japanese aircrewman, picked up on the 18th after his plane splashed nearby.

    During the 19-20 June Battle of the Philippine Sea she remained with the transports, then turned her guns on the neighboring Japanese held island of Tinian. Remaining in the Marianas until mid-August, the destroyer alternated gunfire support duties, screening duties and radar picket duties off Saipan with bombardment of Tinian until that island was invaded 24 July, then provided support services for the troops fighting there. In August she shifted to Guam to support mopping up operations and on the 17th got underway for Eniwetok to rejoin the fast carrier force, now designated TF 38.

    Arriving on the 20th, the warship sortied with TG 38.3 on the 29th for planned strikes against the Palaus and the Philippines. During the approach, Prichett rescued a pilot from Langley (CVL-27) on 30 August, but then lost one of her own a week later when Seaman First Class J. R. Brassell fell overboard during refueling operations. On 9 September, as the carriers launched air strikes against Japanese installations on Mindanao, light cruisers Birmingham (CL-62), Santa Fe (CL-60) and four destroyers, including Prichett, ambush a Japanese coastal convoy of over two dozen small craft off Mindanao, sinking or beaching every one. For the next two weeks, the carrier task group struck targets in Mindanao, the Visayas and even Luzon, taking a diversionary sweep back south on the 15th to pound Peleliu for four days before hitting airfields around Manila on the 21st and 22d.

    After rearming at the temporary anchorage at Ulithi, the force sortied again on 6 October, intending to strike airfields on Nansei Shoto, Luzon and Formosa in preparations for the upcoming landings in the Philippines. Following a fighter sweep raid over northern Luzon on 11 October, the TG sailed north to strike Formosa. Unfortunately, during an alert caused by Japanese air raids just after sunset on 12 October, a destroyer from the screen of TG 38.4 accidentally opened fire on Prichett with a 40mm machine gun, mortally wounding one sailor and wounding 15 others. Despite the casualties, the warship resumed screen duties for three more days -- during which her 5-inch guns knocked down an enemy bomber at extremely long range -- until retiring to Manus for repairs and replenishment.

    From the Admiralties, she steamed to Ulithi and rejoined TG 38.3 for further strikes against Luzon and the Visayas in early November, further whittling down Japanese airpower in the region. While on screen gurad, Prichett rescued two Essex (CV-9) pilots who ditched aircraft near the destroyer on 13 November. The force returned again to the Luzon area in late November, with Prichett escorting carriers during air strikes against Japanese bases there. On the 25th her crew witnessed a kamikaze strike that damaged carrier Essex. After returning to Ulithi at the end of the month, the carriers put to sea again on 11 December, this time striking the Manila Bay area during the landings on Mindoro. The destroyer rescued another flier on the 15th before an approaching typhoon broke off combat operations.

    On 30 December the Ulithi logistics base was left behind again as the force steamed west to welcome the new year with strikes against Luzon on 6-7 January 1945 and Formosa on the 9th. The carrier TG then steamed into the South China Sea to strike at enemy coastal shipping as far south as Saigon in French Indochina. Returning north, the carriers conducted fighter sweeps over Hainan, Amoy and Hong Kong in China before hitting the Japanese on Formosa again. They then retired to Ulithi, replenished, rearmed, and, on 10 February, departed to raid the industrial complexes of Honshu. After striking Tokyo and Yokohama, the force turned back to cover the landings on Iwo Jima, 19 February. There Prichett was reassigned to TU 52.2.5, with which she remained in the Iwo Jima-Chichi Jima area until 9 March.

    By 12 March, DD-561 was back at Ulithi to prepare for the invasion of Okinawa. Attached to TF 54, Prichett arrived off the objective 25 March to cover minesweeping and underwater demolition team operations. Preinvasion bombardment, harassment fire and fire support missions off Kerama Retto followed. On 1 April, she participated in the demonstration “feint” on southern Okinawa, then swung around to screen the transports off the Hagushi assault area. At dawn the next day, a single Japanese aircraft made a surprise run on the destroyer, catching the spotters unaware and dropping a 500-pound bomb a scant 20 yards off the port beam. It was a sign of things to come, for later in the day Prichett took station on the radar picket line - a ring of ships serving as an outer warning net to detect enemy air raids - against which the Japanese directed many of their air raids.

    Just after 0100 on 3 April, several enemy groups were picked up on radar. Four aircraft were then spotted visually at 0129 and, although the first was shot down and the second driven off, the second two closed the warship, with one dropping a 500 pound bomb on the fantail. Exploding close under the counter, the bomb holed the destroyer below the waterline, causing flooding aft and a fire in the 20mm clipping room. The destroyer, maintaining a speed in excess of 28 knots to minimize flooding and bring the fire under control, continued to ward off enemy planes -- shooting down two others that pressed their attacks too close. Relieved by Brush (DD-745) shortly before noon, the damaged destroyer retired to Kerama Retto for emergency repairs. On the 7th, she got underway for Guam and a month of extensive repairs.

    Prichett departed Guam on 3 May in company with Shipley Bay (CVE-85) and returned to Okinawa on the 7th. Although she resumed dangerous radar picket duties soon thereafter, the warship escaped further damage for almost three months -- though it was not for lack of trying by the Japanese. On 29 July, Prichett was steaming on pickett duty when an antiquated Japanese biplane snuck in under the radar and crashed destroyer Callaghan (DD-792) at 0040. Closing to rescue survivors blown into the water, Prichett ran up alongside to assist Callaghan's crew fight the extensive fires. In the fire-lit darkness, the ships proved an easy target and a second aircraft closed in. Despite being taken under fire at 5,000 yards, the Japanese kamikaze bore in, came up the starboard side, banked left and crashed six feet from the waterline. The aircraft bomb exploded on contact, stoving in the hull, damaging the superstructure and killing two sailors. Despite her damage, Prichett remained in the area for another two hours picking up survivors from Callaghan.

    Awarded a Navy Unit Commendation for her actions off Okinawa, Prichett sailed for home 13 August. Arriving after the cessation of hostilities, she underwent preinactivation overhaul at Puget Sound and on 14 March 1946 was decommissioned and berthed with the San Diego Group, Pacific Reserve Fleet.

    Reactivated after the invasion of the Republic of Korea by the North Korean People’s Army, Prichett recommissioned 17 August 1951. Post activation shakedown off California followed and on 13 January 1952 she got underway for the Atlantic. Arriving at Norfolk, 2 February, she operated off the Mid-Atlantic seaboard until April, then underwent modernization at Boston. Emerging in November with the latest in anti-aircraft weaponry, fire control radar, sonar and communications gear, she became the flagship of DesDiv 282. She completed further training in the Caribbean and departed Norfolk, 4 January 1953, for a tour in the Korean combat zone.

    Steaming via the Panama Canal, she arrived at Sasebo 11 February and on the 15th rendezvoused with TF 77. Between then and 23 June she performed plane guard and screening duties for the carriers of TF 77, screened battleships and cruisers during bombardment missions, and provided gunfire support at Wonsan Harbor and the Hungnam coast, plane control, interdiction and harassment fire, as well as hospital ship services for the Marines fighting in coastal areas, primarily near Wonsan.

    Prichett steamed towards Norfolk on 26 June 1953 and completed her round-the-world cruise 22 August via Manila, Singapore, Columbo and Aden to the Suez Canal, then Athens, Genoa, Cannes, Algiers and Gibralter. After a modernization overhaul at Norfolk, the destroyer deployed to the Mediterranean for a three-month cruise between 7 January and 11 March 1954. Then, after exercises in the West Indies and a shipyard availability, she got underway, 5 January 1955, to return to the Pacific.

    Assigned to DesDiv 192, the destroyer reported to CinCPac 17 January and by May she was enroute to Japan for her first WestPac deployment since the Korean War. Homeported at Long Beach for the next nine years, she alternated 7th Fleet tours, Fleet exercises and Taiwan Strait patrols with training operations, including sonar and gunnery school ship assignments, off the west coast. Highlights of these years included training exercises with Japanese and South Korean naval forces as well as ASW patrols in the Sea of Japan and the Taiwan Straits. She also responded to maritime emergencies and distress calls, such as the 5 April 1961 explosion and fire that crippled Chinese Nationalist tanker Kwang Lung in Kaohsiung harbor, Taiwan. Fire fighting crews from Prichett reached the stricken vessel in minutes, helping to control the blaze and avert a major disaster. Later in June, the destroyer towed a stranded Japanese fishing boat into Kaohsiung. In August 1964, however, her 7th Fleet deployment was extended and, for the third time, she joined in combat operations in the western Pacific.

    On 30 August 1964 she joined TF 77 in the Tonkin Gulf and until mid-October operated in the South China Sea in support of South Viet Namese and American operations against North Viet Namese and Viet Cong forces. Homeported at San Diego on her return, Prichett began a cycle of combat tours to Vietnam that would last for the next five years. Her first full deployment to Vietnam took place between 27 April and 3 November1965, during which the destroyer screened carriers operating at Yankee Station and conducted shore bombardment missions at Chu Lai and near Danang. Her second deployment, between 2 July and 3 December 1966, was spent mostly on the gunline in IV Corps military zone off South Vietnam, attacking Viet Cong concentrations around the Saigon River. She also conducted radar picket duty in the Tonkin Gulf. After a six months of modernization work in mid-1967, Prichett sailed on her third tour on 18 November, beginning gunline operations in late December off the Cue Viet River. These gunfire support missions were particularly useful in February 1968 during the Vietnamese Tet offensive, when Prichett's guns proved critical during the month-long battle for Phan Thiet. Her fire was so accurate and steady that captured Viet Cong fighters said they'd nicknamed the warship "The Mortar from the Sea." After combat operations ebbed in March, the destroyer returned home on 26 May.

    After spending almost a year undergoing repairs, upkeep and local training operations, including a major Fleet exercise in March 1969, Prichett conducted one last Vietnam deployment beginning on 4 June. While still underway, however, the warship was scheduled for survey and, upon arrival home, Prichett was inspected on 5 December. Recommended for disposal on 17 December, the destroyer sailed to the Inactive Ship Facility at San Diego and was decommissioned 10 January 1970 and struck from the Navy List that same day. A week later the destroyer transferred to Italy in an "as is where is" condition. The destroyer served in the Italian Navy as Geniere (D 555) until disposal sometime during 1975.

    Prichett earned eight battle stars during World War II, two during the Korean Conflict and six battle stars for Vietnam service.


    CVE-85 U.S.S. Shipley Bay - History

    Makassar Strait
    (CVE-91) dp. 7,800 1. 512'3" b. 65' ew. 108'1" dr. 22'6" s. 19 k. cpl. 860 a. 1 5", 8 40mm., 20 20mm., 28 dct cl. Casablanca T. S4-S2-BB3)

    Makassar Strait ( CVE: 91) was originally classified AVG-91, reclassified ACV 91 on 20 August 1942, and reclassified CVE-91 on 15 July 1943 originally named Ulitaka Bay and renamed Makassar Strait 6 November 1943 laid down by Kaiser Co., Inc., Vancouver, Wash., under Maritime Commission contract 29 December 1943 launched 22 March 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Truman J. Eledding, and commissioned at Astoria, Oreg., 27 April 1944, Capt. Warren K. Berner in command.

    After shakedown along the west coast, Makassar Strait departed San Diego 6 June and steamed via Pearl Harbor to the Marshalls carrying replacement aircraft and passengers thence, she transported military casualties to Pearl Harbor and the west coast where she arrived San Diego 13 July. During much of the next 2 months she trained carrier pilots off southern California. Between 25 September and 15 October she ferried 129 planes

    to Hawaii and to Manus, Admiralties. After returning to Pear Harbor 26 October with 70 damaged wildcats on board, she resumed pilot training operations out of Pearl Harbor.

    During the next 3 months Makassar Strait rendered valuable service in the training of naval and marine aviators. Pilots from a dozen air groups and squadrons made more than 6,700 landings as she participated in combat air patrol and hunter-killer training exercises and night carrier operations, as well as defensive training against simulated bomb and torpedo attacks.

    With Composite Squadron 97 embarked,Makassar Strait departed Pearl Harbor 29 January 1945 and steamed via Eniwetok for combat duty in the western Pacific. Assigned to TG 50.8, between 9 February and 8 April she protected logistics ships operating in support of the Fast Carrier Task Force during devastating airstrikes against enemy targets from the Bonins to the Ryukyus.

    Assigned to a support carrier group 8 April, Makassar Strait began air operations in the intense fighting on Okinawa. During the next 4 weeks she launched scores of sorties against targets in the Ryukus. Her planes provided close air support for American ground troops and struck with effective and devastating force against enemy gun emplacements, ground installations, and airfields as determined Americans drove to capture Okinawa&mdashthe enemy's last bastion of his crumbling empire. In addition the escort carrier's planes splashed four enemy aircraft.

    Makassar Strait transferred her air squadron to Shipley Bay (CVE-85) at Kerama Retto 7 May and departed later that day for Guam where she arrived the 11th. She now operated in the Marianas between Guam and Saipan providing refresher training for carrier pilots, until departing for Hawaii 19 July. Steaming via KwaJalein where she loaded 50 planes, she reached Pearl Harbor 29 July. There she embarked 387 military passengers and sailed 14 August for the United States.

    Arriving San Diego 21 August, Makassar Strait had steamed more than 91,000 miles in support of the Allied victory in the Pacific. She continued to train carrier pilots during the next 2 months by the end of October the total number of landings on her flight deck since her commissioning had surpassed 15,500.

    Makassar Strait departed San Diego 4 November for "Magic Carpet" duty. Steaming via Pearl Harbor, she transported replacement troops to the Marshalls and after embarking 1,092 veterans at Kwajalein' returned to San Diego 29 November. Between 4 December and 3 January 1946 she made a similar cruise to Guam and back, transporting 1,123 officers and men to the United States.

    Departing San Diego 5 January, Makassar Strait steamed via San Francisco to Tacoma, Wash., where she arrived 12 January. Assigned to the 19th Fleet, she underwent deactivation and decommissioned 9 August 1946. She entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Tacoma and, while berthed there, was reclassified CVU 91 on 12 June 1955. On 28 August 1958 the Secretary of' the Navy authorized her to be used as target to destruction. Her name was struck from the Navy list 1 September 1958. Makassar Strait received two battle stars for World War II service.


    Edgar Tilghman Neale, USN

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    Ranks

    Decorations

    Warship Commands listed for Edgar Tilghman Neale, USN


    ShipRankTypeFromTo
    USS Shipley Bay (CVE 85)T/Capt.Escort carrier21 Mar 19441 Feb 1945

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    Watch the video: Birth of the CVE